Masking - Internal Masks

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TerryMillard
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:19 pm

Masking - Internal Masks

Post by TerryMillard »

Hi,

I’m new to Photoshop and the Artisan Pro X panel. I’m working my way through the videos and learning a great deal. I love Artisan Pro X. I’m already able to create images I was never able to achieve with Photoshop.

I created my Critical Mask and I’m working on the Internal Masks. Is there a best practice method for splitting the critical mask into multiple internal masks so there aren’t any gaps or overlaps between internal masks? I’ve tried several methods (remember, this is all new to me) and I’m finding gaps and overlaps that cause issues.

Thank you,
Terry
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Joel
Owner/Admin
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2020 1:50 pm
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Re: Masking - Internal Masks

Post by Joel »

TerryMillard wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:32 pm Hi,

I’m new to Photoshop and the Artisan Pro X panel. I’m working my way through the videos and learning a great deal. I love Artisan Pro X. I’m already able to create images I was never able to achieve with Photoshop.

I created my Critical Mask and I’m working on the Internal Masks. Is there a best practice method for splitting the critical mask into multiple internal masks so there aren’t any gaps or overlaps between internal masks? I’ve tried several methods (remember, this is all new to me) and I’m finding gaps and overlaps that cause issues.

Thank you,
Terry
Terry,

The best way is to always start with the Critical mask and make sure that is as accurate as possible, and already includes mask optimization (feathering). The internal masks can then be derived from the critical mask by subtraction of selections. I prefer doing this with the pen tool set to a specific feathering of mostly 1 pixel when transforming the vector mask to a pixel mask, or sometimes with the rectangular marquee tool if they're absolutely straight verticals/horizontals. I never do this any other way than by subtraction. If you keep the feathering the same then there can be no overlap, but there will be some very small gaps resulting in a thin line. I would remove this by just brushing over it. Keep in mind that internal masks are usually only needed when we have multiple planes separated by a natural edge, which is rarely the case in natural objects and almost always the case in manmade, geometrical objects. Therefore, using the pen tool to subtract from the critical mask is my recommendation. If you need to know more about masking then everything is explained in the Advanced Masking video.
Joel Tjintjelaar - admin/owner
https://www.bwvision.com/
TerryMillard
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2021 2:19 pm

Re: Masking - Internal Masks

Post by TerryMillard »

Hi Joel,

Thank you for detailed reply.

I purchased and watched the Advanced Masking videos last week. The videos are great! I’ll watch them again. I imagine you discussed the process in the video it was just all so new to me that it went over my head.

Thanks again,
Terry
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Joel
Owner/Admin
Posts: 42
Joined: Tue Dec 08, 2020 1:50 pm
Contact:

Re: Masking - Internal Masks

Post by Joel »

TerryMillard wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 7:47 pm Hi Joel,

Thank you for detailed reply.

I purchased and watched the Advanced Masking videos last week. The videos are great! I’ll watch them again. I imagine you discussed the process in the video it was just all so new to me that it went over my head.

Thanks again,
Terry
Terry,
The information I try to convey in the video is something that I haven't seen anywhere else but is quite fundamental. Perhaps for that reason it may be hard to grasp. It's easier to watch a 15 minute Youtube video that screams 'best masking technique', but that is nonsense. It doesn't exist as it all depends on the photo at hand. And what no one ever tells you is that masking starts in the field.
Joel Tjintjelaar - admin/owner
https://www.bwvision.com/
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